Full Policy Language & References

1.4 Support transportation and planning policies, including funding for implementation, operations and maintenance that favor walking, bicycling and use of public transportation, and are synergistic with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

References

Organization Policy (Source)
CDPH Policies that support active transportation help Californians incorporate more health-promoting physical activity into their lives, while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions and other harmful co-pollutants. Infill development can help to reduce urban sprawl, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and support location-efficient housing that promotes active transportation and allows workers to reap both economic and health benefits. (Health in All Policies Task Force Report to the Strategic Growth Council, December 3, 2010 – Executive Summary, page 7)
CHEAC Support legislation and funding that encourages consideration of public health impacts in the design and planning of healthy communities. Support efforts to develop climate change mitigation strategies to help protect against potential impacts on human health. (CHEAC 2016 Legislative Platform)
CSAC There are direct human health benefits associated with mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, such as lowering rates of obesity, injuries, and asthma. Counties believe that prevention, planning, research and preparation are the keys to coping with the public health issues brought about by climate change, and that any public policy related to climate change and public health must take into account the existing roles and resources of county government. (California State Association of Counties (CSAC) Climate Change Policy Statements and Principles, November 2007, page 11)

1.5 Prioritize active transportation infrastructure and programming, with the goal of making it possible for the majority of the population to achieve the U.S. Surgeon General’s recommended minutes of physical activity as part of their daily routine.

References

Organization Policy (Source)
National Prevention Strategy Promote the development of transportation options and systems that encourage active transportation and accommodate diverse needs.
Support adoption of active living principles in community design, such as mixed land use, compact design, and inclusion of safe and accessible parks and green space. (National Prevention Strategy, 2011 – Active Living, Actions)
CDC Increase opportunities for physical activities by devoting increased resources to non-motorized transportation options. (CDC Recommendations for Improving Health through Transportation Policy, 2010, page 5)
Active Living Research Expert evaluations conclude that adults who live in walkable neighborhoods are more physically active and indicate that land use policy should be considered an important public health issue.
Introducing sidewalks, bike trails and traffic calming devices can lead to increased physical activity.
Walking for transportation is consistently related to having many destinations near homes, connected streets and high residential density. (Kerr, J. Designing for Active Living Among Adults. A Research Summary. Princeton, NJ: Active Living Research, a National Program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Spring 2008, page 5)
Los Angeles County 2.4 Parks, 5. Support proposals to fund or promote partnering opportunities with social service and health agencies to increase healthy activities and exercise programs in parks for youth and adults.
2.4 Parks, 6. Support proposals to fund or promote after-school programs in park facilities and schools operated by parks and recreation agencies, with special incentives and funding for programs identified in high-crime areas.
3.2 Land Use Planning, 4. Support legislation that promotes the development of housing sites near public transit hubs, discourages sprawl or promotes urban design that encourages safe walking, cycling routes to commercial districts and schools if financed by a mutually agreed upon funding mechanism.
4.6 Public Health, Support proposals that increase the prevalence and safety of sidewalks, walking, trails, bike paths and parks; promote safe walking and biking routes to schools and commercial districts; and promote complete streets while making streets safe and accessible for all users including automobiles, pedestrians, and bicyclists. (Los Angeles County 2015-16 State Legislative Agenda, Second Year, adopted December 8, 2015; pages 10, 17, 35)

1.6 Support strategies, policies and programs that make transportation networks safe for all users, including Vision Zero, Complete Streets, Safe Routes to School and Safe Routes to Healthy Places policies and implementation.

References

Organization Policy (Source)
CDPH Support active transportation through implementation of “Complete Streets.” Incorporate safety considerations of all roadway users into programs, policies, and community designs. (Health in All Policies Task Force Report to the Strategic Growth Council, December 3, 2010 – Active Transportation Recommendations I.A.2 and I.A.3, page 25)
American Public Health Association (APHA) Supporting the use of the Complete Streets methodology, which considers health effects on all transportation users
Expanding Safe Routes to School programs, which encourage children, including children with disabilities, to walk and bike to school safely. (APHA Fact Sheet, Undated/Downloaded June 2016 – Active Transportation)
Let’s Get Healthy California Increase the number of walk trips per capita and the percentage of children who walk, bike and skate to school are priorities for creating healthy communities. (Let’s Get Healthy California Task Force Report, December 2012, page 21)
California Office of Planning and Research Planning connected bike and pedestrian paths increase alternatives to auto use. Both transit oriented development (TOD) and infill development also create an opportunity for more active lifestyles. Complete Streets and multimodal, interconnected transit allow access to services, housing, school, open space recreation areas, and other amenities without the need for vehicles. In conjunction with a robust public transportation system, first and last mile policies- addressing the need to provide connections between destinations and the beginning or end of transit- ensure increased mobility. Additional infrastructure such as covered rest areas, shade, age friendly seating, and bike storage are important to increase utilization. (California Office of Planning and Research Draft General Plan Guidelines for Public Comment, 2015, page 224)
Vision Zero Los Angeles Vision Zero is a road safety policy that promotes smart behaviors and road design and anticipates mistakes so that collisions do not result in severe injury of death. The City of Los Angeles has set the goal to eliminate traffic deaths by 2025 using a data driven approach by prioritizing areas for safety improvements. (http://visionzero.lacity.org)
New York City Vision Zero Action Plan New York City Vision Zero Action Plan 2014 brings together government, advocacy, private sector and the public to improve street safety. The Action Plan includes proposed city actions for City Hall, Police Department, Department of Transportation, Taxi and Limousine Commission, Department of Citywide Administrative Services and Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Actions include: increasing the enforcement of moving violations; improving street designs; holding public outreach sessions; increasing penalties for dangerous drivers; reducing speed limits; and increasing the use of enforcement cameras. (New York City Vision Zero Action Plan 2014)

1.7 Promote built environment policies that favor physical activity in both recreational and non-recreational settings.

References

Organization Policy (Source)
Healthy People 2020 Healthy People 2020 Physical activity objectives support the health benefits of regular physical activity. There are objectives related to increasing the proportion of trips made by walking and bicycling by adults as well as increasing legislative policies for the built environment that enhance access to and availability of physical activity opportunities. (https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/physical-activity)
Los Angeles County 2.4 Parks, 1. Support proposals to fund for acquisition, development, and rehabilitation of parks and recreation facilities and open space, and seek additional funding for the establishment of new urban parks in the underserved areas of the County. (Los Angeles County 2015-16 State Legislative Agenda, Second Year, adopted December 8, 2015, page 9)